Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for December, 2012

A brick building with groceries in faded letters

Photo from Flickr: porschelinn

July 2015 Update: Now that I’m on a higher protein diet and am trying to eat more sustainable meats and organic vegetables, it’s up closer to $275-$300.

Along with trying to take the best care of my health due to my hypoglycemia, I also try to take the best care of myself financially. A huge Dave Ramsey devotee, I took the time two days ago to look over my monthly expenditures for each “category” of spending and see how much I’ve spent. It was very eye-opening to see what I budgeted and what I actually spent, and I’ve since made some adjustments to my budget.

So, how much do I spend on average for groceries? $252 per month.

That seems high for a single person, but a lot of that is fruits and veggies, which I eat large quantities of and, unfortunately, are very expensive in the U.S. One might also point to the fact that I live in Houston, but I checked and I spent the same when I was living in a smaller town too.

How does this compare to what you are spending? If you aren’t hypoglycemic and reading this, I’m especially interested in hearing if this is different for you?

Read Full Post »

My book of lists and my new Michigan State University lunch bag thanks to my friend Andrea!

My book of lists and my new Michigan State University lunch bag thanks to my friend Andrea!

I had a full day of errands the other day and so I packed up my car so that I wouldn’t be stuck without food, be tempted to spend money on food, and be tempted by unhealthy food, during my long day.

So, along with my book of lists and print-outs, I had a new water bottle thanks to my friend Angie (not pictured) and a new lunch bag thanks to my friend Andrea, to help me stay healthy. Both were graduation gifts and thus have the Michigan State University emblem on them!

Anyway, in the lunch bag is the following:

  • A pre-rinsed apple and an individual Babybel cheese for a snack.
  • A Coke Zero (yes, I know, I shouldn’t be drinking caffeine, let alone pop, but honesty….).
  • A Vanilla Myoplex Lite protein shake for my second snack.

My only complaint is that this is a LOT of liquid (water, soda, and protein shake) for being on the go to so much. Maybe I’ll have to rethink that next time.

Other valuable posts:

Outline of a Hypoglycemic Diet

Travel tips for hypoglycemics and healthy eaters

How I lost the weight (and keep it off)!

Read Full Post »

If you are a hypoglycemic, you MUST carry food with you at all times!  There is no exception to this!  In fact, I had a doctor who, every time she saw me in her office, would make me show her that I food on me!

General Tips:

  • My general rule of thumb is to carry 9 hours worth of food (3 protein/carb snacks) with me at all times in my bag while in the U.S. (this just doesn’t mean while traveling, it’s EVERY DAY of my life) and 12 hours (4 snacks) with me while outside my own country.
  • For all of the snacks you carry with you, try to use them sparingly and replenish them as much as possible. Remember, the idea is to keep a good stash of food on you at all times, so don’t deplete your stash too much! It just pays to be prepared.  Getting into your stash as little as possible takes some pre-planning, but it’s not too difficult. If you walk into somewhere and notice a free bowl of fruit, grab an apple to eat  later instead of your dried fruit. Or, while grabbing lunch somewhere, purchase a small snack to have for your afternoon snack at the same time and carry it with you.
  • A purse isn’t the only option. You can use a backpack, satchel, briefcase, wristlet etc.

My Food Bag:

Here are two photos of my food bag that is always in my purse. The bag is a rubbery material which keeps moisture out. I picked it up in the school supply section of a store.

Purse with a bag full of food sticking out of it

One of my favorite purses and my food bag, which fits (tightly) in it.

This shows the contents of my food bag usually. 1 Clif Bar, 2 portioned bags of nuts, 1 box of raisins, 1 box of dried cranberries, and a Zone bar.

This shows the contents of my food bag usually. 1 Clif Bar, 2 portioned bags of nuts, 1 box of raisins, 1 box of dried cranberries, and a Zone bar.

So, as you can see, the total for the food bag is actually 12 hours.

  1. Clif Bar if I need something a little more substantial.
  2. 1 box of cranberries and a bag of nuts for a light snack.
  3. 1 box of raisins and a bag of nuts for a light snack.
  4. 1 Zone Bar for a light snack.

Other valuable posts:

Outline of a Hypoglycemic Diet

Travel tips for hypoglycemics and healthy eaters

How I lost the weight (and keep it off)!

Read Full Post »

A nice, steaming pot of low fat white chicken chili

A nice, steaming pot of low fat white chicken chili

I LOVE making Chili and especially white chicken chili. So, that’s what I did over Thanksgiving break. It made so much that I ended up feeding my neighbors too. They asked for the recipe, so here it is! Yum!!!

Low Fat White Chicken Chili Recipe

(adapted from a Food.com recipe)

3 cloves garlic

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 lbs. cubed boneless skinless chicken

1 medium onion, chopped

2, 15 ounce cans of great northern beans, drained

16 ounces fat free chicken broth

1 ½ poblano peppers, diced

4 ounces (about 2) jalapeno peppers, diced

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon oregano

1 teaspoon cumin

½ teaspoon cayenne pepper

½ teaspoon black pepper

1 cup sour cream

1/3 cup low fat milk

Directions:

  1. Saute the first 4 ingredients together
  2. Add beans, broth, peppers, and all of the spices. Simmer for 30 minutes.
  3. Add the sour cream and milk. Stir frequently until hot.
  4. Serve with water crackers or saltines.

Nutrition:

NOTE THE SERVING SIZE! Nutritional info. using SparkPeople’s Recipe Calculator:

Nutrition Facts
User Entered Recipe
8 Servings
Amount Per Serving
Calories 262.4
Total Fat 8.9 g
Saturated Fat 4.5 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.8 g
Monounsaturated Fat 3.5 g
Cholesterol 25.4 mg
Sodium 567.5 mg
Potassium 827.5 mg
Total Carbohydrate 32.0 g
Dietary Fiber 6.7 g
Sugars 1.6 g
Protein 14.9 g
Vitamin A 8.2 %
Vitamin B-12 5.4 %
Vitamin B-6 15.1 %
Vitamin C 27.9 %
Vitamin D 1.3 %
Vitamin E 2.9 %
Calcium 15.2 %
Copper 19.7 %
Folate 23.8 %
Iron 25.2 %
Magnesium 19.8 %
Manganese 42.2 %
Niacin 18.8 %
Pantothenic Acid 5.8 %
Phosphorus 23.0 %
Riboflavin 9.8 %
Selenium 11.0 %
Thiamin 11.5 %
Zinc 12.3 %
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Read Full Post »