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Archive for March, 2014

Slices of cucumbers topped with hummus, paprika and a slice of carrotSlices of cucumbers topped with hummus, paprika and a slice of carrotSlices of cucumbers topped with hummus, paprika and a slice of carrot

Parties and pot-lucks can be especially difficult places for a hypoglycemic to eat healthy. Here is an easy, healthy appetizer that you can take with you to your next get-together.

 

Ingredients (makes about 20 bites):

  • 1 cucumber
  • 3/4 regular tub of your favorite hummus (I used red pepper for this to add some extra flavor)
  • Paprika
  • 2-3 baby carrots

 

Preparation:

*Note: I noticed that the hummus and carrot tend to dry-out fast, so I recommend making this very close to eating time or making sure you have a way to air-tight cover and refrigerate it.

*Prep tip: I recommend preparing these on something other than your final serving dish because, if you don’t, your serving dish will end up with paprika all over it.

  1. Slice the cucumber into individual slices (thick enough to hold the hummus)
  2. Top with hummus
  3. Sprinkle with paprika
  4. Cut a slice of the baby carrot and set it in the hummus
  5. Enjoy!

 

Make it Fancy:

  • Using a peeler, peel a few sections around the cucumber prior to slicing it so that the pattern on the cucumber alternates between peeled sections and non-peeled sections to create a striped pattern on the cucumber.
  • Load the hummus into a baker’s frosting bag and use a fancy tip to put the hummus on the cucumber.
  • Use other vegetables or cuts (shredded carrots, for example) as the final garnish
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A group of people eating a snack

Photo from Flickr Creative Commons: Mai Le

One of the most difficult social situations, in my opinion, for a hypoglycemic, is to have to eat while out at a bar or club with friends. It is ESSENTIAL, especially if consuming alcohol, that a hypoglycemic still eat when they are supposed to, but it can be tough while out with friends.

I’ve already covered how to carry food with you at a bar/club, so today I’ll focus on how to eat in a way that is the least intrusive and socially acceptable. Note: These are only my opinions, you may think otherwise or have other ideas. If so, please comment! I’d love to hear your thoughts!

If you’re at a place that doesn’t serve food, it’s usually acceptable to eat inside. Most of my friends know I’m hypoglycemic and are used to me eating in front of them, so they think nothing of it. I choose snacks that are easily portable and discrete (usually a protein bar or individual portions of dried fruit and nuts). I’ll keep them as out-of-sight as possible, break-off individual bites and pop them in my mouth. The point here is to not hide it, but be discrete.

If the place does serve food and/or you are with someone you don’t feel comfortable eating in front of, I recommend taking what a former waitressing colleague of mine called a “non-smoking smoke break” (she got mad that smokers got breaks while we worked and we didn’t, so she came up with this).  I’ll usually excuse myself and go outside (where the smokers tend to be), quickly eat my snack, and then go back in.

Why, if the place offers food, should I not get their food?

  • It’s not healthy.
  • It doesn’t have the right combination of carbohydrates and protein you need.
  • For me personally: I’m on a limited budget and food costs money. I’d rather spend that money on better food/other types of fun.

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A salad with spinach, cucumbers, goat cheese, dried cranberries and garbanzo beans

A photo of my salad (no dressing!). Note: Since running the nutrition information, I’ve cut the garbanzo beans.

In previous posts, I’ve written that a diet rule I always break is that I don’t eat salads. Well, after having a heart-to-heart with myself about me not getting enough vegetables in my diet, I decided to try to create a salad I COULD eat (has the right combination of carbohydrates/protein) and try to eat it once a day to improve my veggie intake.

Recipe Ingredients:

  • 3 cups baby spinach
  • 1 single-serving box of cranberries
  • 1 oz soft goat cheese
  • 1/2 of a cucumber

Note: There is no salad dressing listed above. Yep, that’s right, NONE; that’s where the majority of your fat and calories come from, so I eat my salads dry.

I usually pair my salad with a single slice of country bread and 1/2 tbsp (yes, I measure it sometimes to make sure) extra virgin olive oil.

The nutrition calculations for with and without the bread and oil are below. I encourage you to look at them and see if it’ll work for you.

Another note: I originally was adding garbanzo beans to this salad to add protein, but it spiked the nutrition calculation, especially calories and carbohydrates so much, that I didn’t include it in this version of the recipe. Word to the wise: if you add something, even if you think it’s innocent like chick peas, recheck your nutrition calculation.

According to Spark People’s Recipe Calculator, for just the salad:

Nutrition Facts
User Entered Recipe
  1 Serving
Amount Per Serving
  Calories 243.4
  Total Fat 6.4 g
  Saturated Fat 4.2 g
  Polyunsaturated Fat 0.3 g
  Monounsaturated Fat 1.4 g
  Cholesterol 13.0 mg
  Sodium 176.5 mg
  Potassium 609.5 mg
  Total Carbohydrate 40.0 g
  Dietary Fiber 4.4 g
  Sugars 2.6 g
  Protein 8.2 g
  Vitamin A 176.9 %
  Vitamin B-12 0.9 %
  Vitamin B-6 13.4 %
  Vitamin C 46.7 %
  Vitamin D 0.0 %
  Vitamin E 9.3 %
  Calcium 13.6 %
  Copper 17.1 %
  Folate 46.2 %
  Iron 17.3 %
  Magnesium 20.3 %
  Manganese 43.8 %
  Niacin 4.4 %
  Pantothenic Acid     3.4 %
  Phosphorus     12.7 %
  Riboflavin 17.0 %
  Selenium 2.4 %
  Thiamin 6.8 %
  Zinc 5.6 %
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Salad plus one slide country bread and 1/2 tbsp olive oil:

Nutrition Facts
User Entered Recipe
  1 Serving
Amount Per Serving
  Calories 423.4
  Total Fat 14.9 g
  Saturated Fat 5.2 g
  Polyunsaturated Fat 2.3 g
  Monounsaturated Fat 6.4 g
  Cholesterol 13.0 mg
  Sodium 326.5 mg
  Potassium 609.5 mg
  Total Carbohydrate 62.0 g
  Dietary Fiber 4.9 g
  Sugars 5.6 g
  Protein 11.2 g
  Vitamin A 176.9 %
  Vitamin B-12 0.9 %
  Vitamin B-6 13.4 %
  Vitamin C 46.7 %
  Vitamin D 0.0 %
  Vitamin E 9.3 %
  Calcium 17.6 %
  Copper 17.1 %
  Folate 56.2 %
  Iron 25.3 %
  Magnesium 20.3 %
  Manganese 43.8 %
  Niacin 10.4 %
  Pantothenic Acid     3.4 %
  Phosphorus     12.7 %
  Riboflavin 23.0 %
  Selenium 2.4 %
  Thiamin 16.8 %
  Zinc 5.6 %
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

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