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Posts Tagged ‘breakfast’

The plate includes scrambled eggs with corn & black beans, 1 piece raisin/cinnamon toast (I prefer whole wheat) with peanut butter, a tiny portion of oatmeal with a tablespoon of almonds, an apple and coffee with cream only. The banana and Cheerios are for breakfast #2 (long day).

Breakfast at Hyatt Place in Washington D.C. The plate includes scrambled eggs with corn & black beans, 1 piece raisin/cinnamon toast (I prefer whole wheat) with peanut butter, a tiny portion of oatmeal with a tablespoon of almonds, an apple and coffee with cream only. The banana and Cheerios are for breakfast #2 (long day).

One of the best rules I made when I started traveling a lot was that, unless impossible, I would stay at hotels that included breakfast.

As a hypoglycemic, breakfast is a crucial part of maintaining your blood sugar. When you wake up in the morning, your blood sugar is really low. I recommend eating a snack right away and then heading down for the included breakfast.

Why does an included breakfast make such a difference? Learn from me, it’s not a good idea to be running around with low blood sugar looking for a breakfast place that’s open. And I have’ had instances where I’ve planned ahead and thought, “Oh, there’s a place right across from the hotel” and then, upon arrival, found out it’s closed, or the prices are ridiculous. By staying a hotel with breakfast included, you eliminate most if not all of the risk of an emergency first thing in the morning. It’s also short walk to breakfast, and you can leave your wallet in your room.

“Continental breakfast” = a bad idea

I’m often attending events that offer a “continental breakfast” and I still stay at a hotel with breakfast included and eat breakfast the hotel. Similarly, I avoid any hotels that say they offer a “continental breakfast.” While the definition varies, from experience a continental breakfast means all carbs and low or no protein; essentially a recipe for a really bad hypoglycemic episode.

I only stay at places that offer a “hot breakfast” or “full breakfast” and I look for photos or call to see what’s included in breakfast.  Primarily, “Do you have eggs?”

My favorite hotel chains for breakfast

When traveling personally, especially overseas, I try to opt for bed and breakfasts, but when I’m traveling for work, it’s almost always a hotel chain that I stay at.

Here are my favorite hotel chains that offer free breakfast:

Hyatt Place: By far my preferred hotel to stay in while traveling. The rooms are nice, spacious, always include a mini-fridge, they have a 24/7 reasonably-priced food ordering service, and their breakfast is mostly consistent and always has several high protein options.

Residence Inn: Second of my favorites, most rooms have a full or almost full (missing the oven) kitchen in them and also include free breakfast with good protein options. The last Residence Inn I stayed at I noticed they put a lot more effort into breakfast during the week than weekends, with more options and real plates/napkins on weekdays  and more limited options and paper plates/napkins (which kills the environmentalist in me) on weekends.

Double-Tree Inn: Honestly I don’t have much experience with these, but I stayed in one recently and it was nice, had a mini fridge, and the breakfast was good with lots of protein options. Obviously I skipped the warm chocolate chip cookie, as tempting as it was.

Not my favorites, but good secondary options

Courtyard by Marriott: They have a “set” breakfast menu you can order from as part of special room packages. However, it’s limited to about 3 or 4 options and only one, at last count, fit my diet. And they are calorie-dense (700-800 calorie breakfast sandwiches).

Fairfield Inn or Hampton Inn: The breakfast at these still has decent protein options, but you’ll notice that the food here isn’t nearly the high quality level as, say a Hyatt Place. And, they always use paper plates/napkins, which, again, kills me as someone who cares about our environment.

What if no hotel in the area offers free breakfast?

Then I look for a hotel with a chain nearby that offers breakfast options. And no, I’m not talking a Waffle House.

Starbucks: Make sure it’s one that offers breakfast sandwiches (some don’t). I opt for the whole wheat turkey bacon and egg white sandwich , a piece of fruit, and a small nonfat latte.

Tim Horton’s: As a Michigan native, I consider myself partially Canadian, which means I love Tim Horton’s (even if they are owned by Burger King now). I opt for the egg white and cheese sandwich.

Chick-fil-a: Remember, they aren’t open on Sundays, so make sure you’re travel doesn’t include a Sunday if this is going to be your breakfast solution. I opt for the Grilled Market Salad and/or a yogurt parfait (usually not a healthy option, but decent there) and coffee.  They do have the Egg White Grill sandwich too, but it’s not my favorite because I’ve had a few that weren’t that great, but an option nonetheless.

And remember, the point is to eat healthy, so think carefully about what you pull from the buffet breakfasts!

Happy travels!

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1 large pancake, about 6 inches diameter, along with all of the ingredients used to make it: Justin's Peanut Butter, Kodiak Power Cakes pancake mix, organic cinnamon, Mariani sliced almonds, Cary's sugar-free syrup

Pancake batter: 1/2 cup Kodiak Power Cakes, 1/2 cup water, 1 Tbsp almonds, dash of cinnamon. On top: 1 tsp peanut butter, 1/4 cup sugar free syrup

I have a weakness for anything breakfast, and especially anything in the french toast or doughy pancake realm. So I was intrigued to find Kodiak Power Cakes Protein Packed Flapjack & Waffle Mix at Costco and decided to give it a try.

I’ve tried other protein pancake mixes, such as MET-Rx High Protein Pancake Mix and haven’t been impressed. But I lived in hope.

And thankfully, I wasn’t disappointed. These pancakes are great!

And while they don’t keep me as full as my usual breakfast of fruit, oatmeal, and almonds, they are a great not-so-unhealthy “treat” once in a while for breakfast.

Hints:

  • I like really doughy pancakes, so I use a small omelet pan and make one big pancake (see photo) vs. small ones. I also found just using water vs. the other suggestions of eggs or milk makes the pancake center more like dough.
  • Adding cinnamon to the mix gives a great flavor punch without adding calories or carbohydrates.

Pancake batter

1/2 cup Kodiak Power Cakes

1/2 cup water

1 Tbsp almonds

dash of cinnamon

On top

1 tsp peanut butter

1/4 cup sugar free syrup

 

 

Enjoy!

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Yes, the bottom of the muffin is below all of the deliciousness

 

Ever on the look-out for more natural (NOT a protein bar) meals I can haul with me to the gym and eat after my workout, I came up with this breakfast sandwich that’s oh-so-good and oh-so-good for you.  With a blend of high fiber, fat and protein, it’s hypoglycemic-friendly and tastes great!

I take it out of the fridge right before I leave and put it in my gym locker. When I’m done with my morning workout (so out of the fridge a max of 1.5 hours, still safe), it’s ready to eat!

Ingredients:

 

Nutrition Facts (via SparkPeople Recipe Calculator)
1 Serving
Amount Per Serving
  • Calories 300.0
  • Total Fat 10.5 g
  • Saturated Fat 3.0 g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.5 g
  • Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Cholesterol 15.0 mg
  • Sodium 490.0 mg
  • Potassium 0.0 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 30.0 g
  • Dietary Fiber 4.0 g
  • Sugars 7.0 g
  • Protein 20.0 g
  • Vitamin A 6.0 %
  • Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-6 0.0 %
  • Vitamin C 0.0 %
  • Vitamin D 0.0 %
  • Vitamin E 0.0 %
  • Calcium 26.0 %
  • Copper 0.0 %
  • Folate 4.0 %
  • Iron 8.0 %
  • Magnesium 0.0 %
  • Manganese 0.0 %
  • Niacin 10.0 %
  • Pantothenic Acid 0.0 %
  • Phosphorus 0.0 %
  • Riboflavin 4.0 %
  • Selenium 0.0 %
  • Thiamin 10.0 %
  • Zinc 0.0 %
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

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This No Sugar Oat Drop Cookie recipe quickly became my go-to breakfast after a friend introduced it to me a few years ago. I go to the gym and then to work, so, because I’m hypoglycemic and because muscle repair is so important, I eat one of these and drink a glass of milk (much-needed protein) after my morning workout each day.

With all that said, I always wondered how the nutrition on them stacked up.

Below is the nutrition for them care of SparkPeople Recipe Calculator. As a side note, I happened to look at the coconut flakes I’m using and they are SWEETENED! Ugh! I’ll be looking for unsweetened next time.

 

Nutrition Facts 

User Entered Recipe 

  12 Servings

Amount Per Serving
  Calories 223.9
  Total Fat 10.3 g
  Saturated Fat 3.5 g
  Polyunsaturated Fat 2.0 g
  Monounsaturated Fat 3.9 g
  Cholesterol 0.0 mg
  Sodium 135.6 mg
  Potassium 250.7 mg
  Total Carbohydrate 29.6 g
  Dietary Fiber 3.4 g
  Sugars 15.9 g
  Protein 2.7 g
  Vitamin A 0.5 %
  Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
  Vitamin B-6 10.5 %
  Vitamin C 5.4 %
  Vitamin D 0.0 %
  Vitamin E 9.4 %
  Calcium 1.9 %
  Copper 5.5 %
  Folate 1.7 %
  Iron 5.8 %
  Magnesium 5.5 %
  Manganese 10.0 %
  Niacin 2.0 %
  Pantothenic Acid     0.9 %
  Phosphorus     3.4 %
  Riboflavin 4.0 %
  Selenium 0.7 %
  Thiamin 2.5 %
  Zinc 1.3 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

 

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As a hypoglycemic, I spend a lot of time preparing foods in the kitchen. This series will go through some useful tools that I use in ways you may or may not of thought of.

ice cream scoop

From Flickr: Sarah G…

Useful tool: Ice cream scoop
Obviously (and sadly), I’m not using the ice cream scoop for ice cream. Instead, I’ve found this to be a really helpful tool when I’m portioning thick batters. It also is convenient way to try to keep all of my muffins, cookies, etc. about the same size.

For example, these High-Fiber Blueberry Bran Muffins are great, but the dough is incredibly thick and sticky. You can’t just pour it into the muffin pan. It’s got to be done some other manual way. So, I use non-stick spray to spray the ice cream scoop and then use that to scoop the batter into the muffin pan. It is much easier and a lot less messy.

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