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Posts Tagged ‘Carbohydrates’

 

 

One of my idiosyncrasies when it comes to food is that I never learned to like cooked fish, only raw fish. I know, I’m strange. Anyway, this means I’m a big fan of sushi. But sushi usually has a ton of white rice in it, which is not low-carb diet and/or hypoglycemic-friendly.

So I did some research (which was a great excuse for a trip to my favorite sushi spot in Houston, Soma Sushi) and you can eat sushi on a low-carb diet or a hypoglycemia diet, but you have to be careful.

Here’s the tips for enjoying sushi on a low-carb and/or hypoglycemic diet:

  • The white rice is the main culprit of blood sugar issues, although be wary of sauces and other sources of carbs.
  • Opt for non-rice rolls or low-rice rolls, such as the Summer Spring Roll and the Mermaid Roll in the photo above (note, one is fried, so it’s not completely innocent, but still low rice and DELICIOUS)
  • Opt for sashimi (no rice)
  • Research and ask about the amount of rice and carbs in each roll and choose wisely. For example, according to Diabetes Daily, a Shrimp Tempura Roll has 75 grams of carbs where a Philadelphia Roll only has 30 grams of carbohydrates.
  • If you aren’t sure about a particular roll’s amount of rice, take a look at online review sites for photos of the rolls.
  • If you’re like me, and your limit is 30-45 grams of carbs per meal, opt for one roll in that range and then fill-in the rest of the meal with no-carb options (such as sashimi, low-carb spring rolls, edamame, etc.)
  • Skip the alcohol as that adds carbs
  • Skip the group sharing experience. I always opt-out of this partially because I’m so picky (I don’t eat shellfish either) and because it’s too easy to lose-track of what you eat.
  • Ask for brown rice: This one I’m not 100% convinced of. While it helps, it doesn’t really fully solve the carbohydrate issue. And, I’m worried that some traditional sushi places will be offended if you ask for this. After not being able to find a good answer online, I contacted several sushi places to ask this question and only one responded (Soma Sushi again!) and said that it’s not offensive to ask, but they don’t  have brown rice.

 

Helpful links:

  • Diabetes Daily.  This article has wonderful suggestions as well as nutrition information (including carbohydrate counts) for many common rolls.
  • The Diabetes Experience. This article has great suggestions, especially related to portion control if you are eating with a group.
  • Just Hungry. This is a guide to chopstick etiquette. It’s really easy to offend accidentally using your chopsticks, so please read this.
  • Sushi FAQ. How to eat sushi etiquette. Very helpful tips on how to eat sushi in general and the etiquette of eating sushi.

 

 

 

 

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a martini glass woth greek yogurt and corn tortilla triangles baled with cinnamon

Presenting it in a martini glass makes it seem more gourmet, don’t you think?

This recipe is similar to one I found in Health Magazine a long time ago. It’s so simple, but a favorites of my friend Melissa.

Ingredients:

For chips:

– Cinnamon

– Butter

– One white corn tortilla per person

For yogurt:

– Vanilla Greek Yogurt (Check the total sugar count on brands. It should be 7g or less per 6 oz) individual serving per person

– Nutmeg, all spice or cinnamon or a combination of the three (get creative!)

Steps:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F
  2. Take each tortilla and lightly coat with butter
  3. Sprinkle cinnamon on each tortilla heavily (you should see very little of the tortilla)
  4. Using kitchen scissors, cut the tortillas into 6 rectangles (like a pizza)
  5. Place on an ungreased baking sheet and bake until completely crisp (you don’t want them to “bend” at all before they break), about 5-8 minutes
  6. While the chips are baking, mix-in any nutmeg, cinnamon or all spice you want in your yogurt if any.
  7. Scoop out 6 oz of vanilla Greek yogurt (one individual serving cup) into individual serving dishes (I like using martini glasses)
  8. When the chips are done, serve them with the yogurt and a spoon

Depending which yogurt you use and the quality of your tortillas, each serving is about 150 calories, 12 grams of protein, and 12 grams of carbohydrates.

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I’ve been on my new high protein, less carb diet for a while now and one day I couldn’t take it anymore…I wanted something sweet. So I scarfed down two “fun size” candy bars I found. Within 30 minutes I was very hyper and turned into a total B*tch (yes, the capital B is on purpose). I actually cut short a meeting with a guy that works for me because I recognized it right away (I guess that’s a positive?). The rest of the day I felt like crap. I’m simply not used to sugar anymore.

Lesson learned

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If you’re hypoglycemic, each snack should include a carbohydrate and a protein. Health Magazine just published “17 High Protein Snacks You Can Eat on the Go.” While I don’t agree with some of these choices (too much processing, sodium, etc.) it is a helpful reminder of options. Check it out!

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Every once in a while, I have what I affectionately call a “bottomless pit” day. This is a day where I can put ANY teenage boy to shame with the amount of food I can consume. Seriously, I can eat double what I usually do and I simply can’t get myself full. It’s the most frustrating thing ever.

I’m sure it has SOMETHING to do with being hypoglycemic, but I have no idea what. Even calls to “nurse lines” leaves me, and the nurse on the other end, clueless. Are you eating healthy stuff? Yep. Are you eating carbohydrates? Yep. Are you eating fats and proteins? Yep, same diet as I do every other day and it works just fine then. Do you feel any different or like your blood sugar is low? Nope, I just can’t get full.

I understand there are factors, such as lack of sleep and stress, that can leave one feeling like they aren’t as full as they are, but I haven’t found any correlation to this either.

Oh, and the next day, I won’t have gained weight which I guess is the one bonus.

Anyone else have these? Anyone have any thoughts?

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I walk up to a counter of a Schlotzsky’s at an airport. After learning a few weeks ago that there are 690 calories in one of their salads, I checked Fitness Pal and came to the conclusion that their medium shaved turkey sandwich minus the mayo is a better option. But it’s still too high in carbohydrates and calories. In reality, I can only eat 3/4 of the sandwich. No problem, at the counter, I ask for the sandwich to be cut in 4ths vs. 1/2. They look at me a bit strangely, but I’m nice and gave them a good tip, so they agree to do it for me. I’m watching as they make it and they forget. I nicely ask again. They apologize and cut it into 4ths.

It takes some getting used to to ask for accommodations especially if you aren’t very assertive, but I’ve found if the request is reasonable and I’m really nice about it, people are happy to do it.

I got on the plane and ate my 3/4 of a sandwich, throwing the other 1/4 away.

What’s your quirky requests? How do you make it work when it comes to portioning your food, protein, and carbohydrates correctly?

For more travel tips, visit these posts:

Travel tips for hypoglycemics and healthy eaters

Traveling healthy, packing for a day of errands

Maintaining your weight while on a cruise

 

 

 

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An empty table at the famous Marchfelderhof Restaurant in Austria

Marchfelderhof Restaurant….oh how I miss Austria. Photo from Flickr Creative Commons, Dennis Jarvis.

 

One of the things I’ve noticed after becoming much more aware of my eating is that someone offering to buy me lunch or dinner has ceased to be an incentive. I’m not talking about  someone deciding to pick up my check when we are already out; what I’m talking about is those “why don’t I buy you lunch or dinner sometime” offers from salespeople, colleagues, etc.

The reality is, most restaurant food is terrible for you because of the amount of calories (want proof? check out the nutrition info for Pei Wei) and added chemicals and preservatives. And, being a hypoglycemic, I eat a lot, so food has ceased to be this wonderful sensual experience most of the time anyway (although I do love a good cheese plate).

Most of the world bonds over food and offering a free meal is a form of gift-giving.  I understand this, so I try to compromise for coffee or a drink or, if they are someone I am really comfortable with, I’ll offer to cook them a nice meal at my home.

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