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Posts Tagged ‘chocolate’

Bins of organic chocolate bars, cookies, and mini bottles of wine at Whole Foods

Those chocolate bars? They are 420 calories. And those cookies? They are 460 calories.

 

Shopping at Whole Foods is a good lesson in correlation vs. causation. It’s easy to walk around Whole Foods and see all of the skinny people and think, “If I shop here, I’ll lose weight!”

The reality is, you can shop at Whole Foods and gain weight, lose weight, or stay the same; it’s all based on WHAT you buy at Whole Foods. Take the cookies and chocolate in the above example. Since they are offered at Whole Foods and contain organic ingredients, they have a health halo effect, meaning you think they are healthier and won’t impact your weight as much. But in terms of calories, sugar, etc. these foods aren’t any healthier for you and will set you back on your weight goals (unless you’re trying to gain weight).

The benefit of upscale grocery chains such as Whole Foods is that they have an abundance of fresh fruits and vegetables, legumes, and unprocessed foods. If you stick to those while shopping at Whole Foods, you have a much better chance of reaching your weight goals.

 

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If you haven’t read this article yet, I highly recommend you do. It really shows how much of our nutrition science is totally false and skewed. It also shows the laziness of a lot of health reporters/editors, who we rely on for accurate information.

I Fooled Millions Into Thinking Chocolate Helps Weight Loss. Here’s How.

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I’ve been on my new high protein, less carb diet for a while now and one day I couldn’t take it anymore…I wanted something sweet. So I scarfed down two “fun size” candy bars I found. Within 30 minutes I was very hyper and turned into a total B*tch (yes, the capital B is on purpose). I actually cut short a meeting with a guy that works for me because I recognized it right away (I guess that’s a positive?). The rest of the day I felt like crap. I’m simply not used to sugar anymore.

Lesson learned

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A single-serving bottle of Svelte cappuccino protein shake

A single-serving bottle of Svelte cappuccino protein shake

I was wandering through (well, fighting my way through) my local grocery store when a friendly woman offered me a taste of a new protein drink, Calnaturale Svelte protein drinks. “Ok,” I said assuming it would be horrible. She asked me what kind I wanted, vanilla, chocolate, or cappuccino. To my surprise, they taste great! She talked me into trying all three flavors and all three tasted very good compared to other protein shakes. I promptly bought two.

They are kind of expensive at $2.99 each, but they have so much protein/carbs/calories in each, that I got two snack servings out of each, which made the price more palatable. And, although not a perfect substitute, the chocolate flavor definitely kept me from buying the chocolate milk I was craving.

Good job Calnaturale! These are great!

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Pieces of chocolate

From flickr timsackton

Yes, I know. Giving up chocolate or even severely cutting-back is a really hard thing for a hypoglycemic.

But now that there’s sugar free chocolate, you can eat all you want, right???  Not so fast. You need to be VERY aware of what we hypoglycemics like to call the “laxative effect.”

Candy makers have to still make sugar-free chocolate  minus the sugar still taste good. So, they use mannitol, sorbitol and/or xylitol, which are sugar alcohols that the human body cannot digest.  So, yep, if you eat too much of it, you are going to get sick.  And this goes for all kinds of sugar free products including baked goods.

So how much can you eat? I found this statement on many websites (but was unable to verify it on the American Dietetic Association’s website): The American Dietetic Association advises that more than 50 grams of sorbitol or 20 grams of mannitol per day can cause diarrhea.

For me, it’s just a rule of thumb not to eat more than two small pieces of the sugar free chocolate or to only have a very small piece of cake/baked good that is sugar free.

Also, don’t forget that sugar free doesn’t mean calorie free or fat free. You can still gain weight by eating sugar free products.

 

For more information, I recommend this article: 

The Dieter’s (and Diabetic Person’s) Guide to Buying Chocolate

 

You might also be interested in: 

Pillsbury Sugar Free Chocolate Fudge Brownie Mix review

Black Bean Brownies

Outline of a hypoglycemic diet

Travel tips for hypoglycemics and healthy eaters

How I lost the weight (and keep it off)!

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