Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Greek yogurt’

One of my friends isn’t feeling well, so she had to cancel our dinner plans for tonight (if you read this, I hope you feel better!). She gave me plenty of notice, but then I got into a busy spiral of work and wedding planning and failed to plan for dinner. But not to fear! This Mediterranean vegetarian salad will save me!

This sucker is a lot of food for a low amount of calories. I always end up feeling full and my blood sugar staying even.

Ingredients:

Preparation (11 minutes):

  • Prepare the Falafel mix according to package instructions
    • Mix with water
    • Let sit for 10 minutes
    • Pan fry
  • Put your salad together. The hummus and yogurt dip act as dressings.

Nutrition info:

Note: I didn’t factor the cooking spray, cucumber, and spinach, because these are so small calorically it’s laughable, but if you want to tack on 20 calories for that, be my guest.

  • 350 calories
  • 11 grams of protein
  • 10.5 grams fat
  • 54 carbs

 

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

A set of Seat to Summit plastic silverware including a fork, knife, and spoon

My Sea to Summit silverware set, drying on a towel in a hotel room for it’s next use

Note: I was not compensated for this post nor did Sea to Summit know about this post prior to me publishing it. 

I travel often and, even when I’m home, I’m on-the-go quite a bit. This has presented a challenge as, although there are fully portable snack options out there, many still require silverware, such as Greek yogurt and graham crackers with peanut butter. And, as you know, I love to take salads with me (Traveling? Take a Whole Foods salad with you) on trips.

This has not only left me scrambling for plastic silverware (or forgetting to, which is worse) whenever I buy a snack or a salad, but also left me with eco-guilt for creating the additional waste from plastic silverware (which isn’t recyclable).

And then I remembered that I saw Sea to Summit portable silverware at my local camping store. One lunch trip and $11 later, I had a set that I clipped inside my backpack, which always goes with me on trips.

Admittedly, the silverware is a bit big for me. It seems like it was designed for maximum inhalation quickly while backpacking and for mostly men to use, so if you get these, be extra-careful to measure out your portions ahead of time and don’t fill the spoon for each bite.

But the benefits far outweigh the size issue. Not only does this solve the silverware worry and some of my eco-guilt, but it also is incredibly sturdy. I’ve used them multiple times, sometimes roughly, and kept them clipped in a backpack that is constantly thrown around. After two months, they still look brand-new. And, as I’ve already eluded to, the carabiner clip they come with is really convenient and makes it harder to lose them.

If you eat a lot of meals on the go, I highly recommend this set of portable silverware.

Read Full Post »

 

Shown next to 1 cup water for scale

 

My most recent go-to evening snack is my homemade fruit & nut yogurt parfait. It only takes a minute to make and I really look forward to it at the end of the day. AND, it keeps me full and my blood sugar even, so no hypoglycemic attacks, all night.

Why not just buy yogurt with the fruit in the bottom? Well, most of those include more added sugars. For example, take this Chobani Fruit On the Bottom Cherry Greek Yogurt. It has 17 grams of sugar (see “Evaporated Cane Juice” in the ingredients)! My version below only has 10 grams of sugar and tastes very fresh.

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup Fage 0% Greek Yogurt (I make this in a coffee cup to keep me accurate)
  • 5 frozen cherries, thawed in the microwave (so slightly warm and with cherry juice)
  • 1 Tbsp shaved almonds
  • Organic cinnamon
Nutrition Facts (from SparkPeople Recipe Calculator)
1 Serving
Amount Per Serving
  • Calories 184.4
  • Total Fat 7.6 g
  • Saturated Fat 0.5 g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 1.8 g
  • Monounsaturated Fat 5.0 g
  • Cholesterol 7.5 mg
  • Sodium 49.0 mg
  • Potassium 191.2 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 14.6 g
  • Dietary Fiber 3.3 g
  • Sugars 10.1 g
  • Protein 16.9 g
  • Vitamin A 0.5 %
  • Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-6 1.0 %
  • Vitamin C 4.5 %
  • Vitamin D 0.0 %
  • Vitamin E 12.7 %
  • Calcium 20.9 %
  • Copper 8.7 %
  • Folate 0.4 %
  • Iron 7.1 %
  • Magnesium 11.1 %
  • Manganese 30.8 %
  • Niacin 0.3 %
  • Pantothenic Acid 0.7 %
  • Phosphorus 8.3 %
  • Riboflavin 8.3 %
  • Selenium 0.0 %
  • Thiamin 0.7 %
  • Zinc 0.3 %
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Read Full Post »

I ended-up running a quick trip to the grocery store a couple of days ago on my lunch break.  I got to the check-out line and piled my items on the conveyor:

  • Plain Greek yogurt
  • Cauliflower
  • Sugar snap peas
  • Dried cranberries
  • Organic salad mix
  • Almonds
  • (I meant to pick-up tofu, but they were out)

The woman (most likely in her late 40’s, trim build) in front of me looked at my assortment of food and said “It looks like my diet. I keep telling my friend, if they want to be skinny, that’s what you have to eat.”

It reminded me of when I got behind some folks from Myanmar in a grocery line a few years ago. I watched them only pile fresh meat and produce on the conveyor. Part of me was annoyed because it took a long time for the cashier to key-in all the produce codes, but if I’m honest with myself, I was more annoyed because I knew what they were eating was better than what I was.

I’m glad I’m not the only one who scopes-out what others put on the line.

Read Full Post »

Recently, I was in Greece to check-out the sites and get in some much-needed relaxation.

Greek Yogurt is served over there, in some form, in breakfast (mostly in general yogurt format), lunch (Tzatziki sauce) and dinner (as a desert, with honey and chopped dried dates).  I have to say, the Greek Yogurt in Greece was WAY BETTER than what we have in the U.S. It was so rich and creamy.

Battle 1: Which Greek Yogurt, easily available in the U.S., is the closest to that in Greece?

This was a simple, easy battle. I walked into a typical Greek grocery store and looked at their yogurt section looking for any brands available in the U.S. Fage was the only one. In taste-testing the 0% and 2% versions of Fage, the 2% is the closest (still a touch too sour) to what we had in Greece. I’ve noticed that eating one of these for an afternoon snack keeps me full for hours, which is a miracle for me.

Battle 2: Lowest Added-Sugar Greek Yogurt

Milk naturally has sugar in it, about 7-8 grams naturally occur in an individual-size (7 oz.) Greek yogurt but that’s an ok amount, especially given the protein you are also getting at the same time. What’s not good, especially for hypoglycemics, but really everyone, is the ADDED sugar they put in them.

A sugar cube is 2.3 grams of sugar, so basically, for every 2 grams of additional sugar, you need to mentally picture another sugar cube.  Check out the sugar cube stacks for Yoplait yogurt as an example.

Obviously, plain Greek yogurt is going to have the least amount of added sugar (basically none), but most people want some flavor. What I’ve found is that the amount of sugar, even in just vanilla Greek yogurt, varies greatly depending on the brands. I had some fun at the grocery store and took photos of different brands and types, including one worst-case scenario. See the comments on each.

Baseline: Fage 2% no flavor is 7 oz. has 8 grams of lactose sugars and 20 grams of protein for 150 calories. This is without any added sugars (chocolate, honey, sugary granola, fruit, etc.). I recommend adding cinnamon vs. a sugar.


Yoplait Greek 100 Calorie Yogurt 4 pack vanilla 

Nutrition label for Yoplait 100 Greek Yogurt

Yes, it’s less calories and looks like a decent amount of sugar, but look at it closer; they messed with the serving size, it’s 5.23 ounces, so about 2 ounces less of yogurt. That explains why the sugars seem fine and the protein is low. I’m guessing this has about 1 sugar cube worth of sugar in it.

H-E-B Greek 100 Calories Vanilla Bean

My local store brand, also the cheapest.

H-E-B Greek 100 Calories Vanilla Bean

ALSO only 5.23 ounces, so much smaller. This has a lot less protein, but look at the sugar! There are at least 2 sugar cubs in this. Also, there are a lot of black dots in this yogurt, I’m thinking a lot of those aren’t vanilla bean seeds, vanilla bean seeds are pretty expensive.

Dannon Light & Fit Greek Vanilla

Dannon Light & Fit Greek Yogurt Vanilla

Also 5.3 ounces, this one tasted the most sugary to me, and I see why. It’s only 80 calories, but only 13 grams of protein and 9 grams of sugar, so I’d guess 2.5-3 sugar cubs in each of these. And you won’t be full.

Chobani Flip Almond Coco Loco Greek Yogurt

Worst case scenario right here, Chobani Flip Almond Coco Loco Greek Yogurt. It’s the same amount of ounces as the others, but remember about 1/3 of that is the toppings, so you’re actually getting a lot less yogurt. The protein is at 12 grams, but the sugar! Oh my! It’s 21 grams, which will definitely counteract the protein. I’m estimating that there are 7 sugar cubes in this.

Read Full Post »

a martini glass woth greek yogurt and corn tortilla triangles baled with cinnamon

Presenting it in a martini glass makes it seem more gourmet, don’t you think?

This recipe is similar to one I found in Health Magazine a long time ago. It’s so simple, but a favorites of my friend Melissa.

Ingredients:

For chips:

– Cinnamon

– Butter

– One white corn tortilla per person

For yogurt:

– Vanilla Greek Yogurt (Check the total sugar count on brands. It should be 7g or less per 6 oz) individual serving per person

– Nutmeg, all spice or cinnamon or a combination of the three (get creative!)

Steps:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F
  2. Take each tortilla and lightly coat with butter
  3. Sprinkle cinnamon on each tortilla heavily (you should see very little of the tortilla)
  4. Using kitchen scissors, cut the tortillas into 6 rectangles (like a pizza)
  5. Place on an ungreased baking sheet and bake until completely crisp (you don’t want them to “bend” at all before they break), about 5-8 minutes
  6. While the chips are baking, mix-in any nutmeg, cinnamon or all spice you want in your yogurt if any.
  7. Scoop out 6 oz of vanilla Greek yogurt (one individual serving cup) into individual serving dishes (I like using martini glasses)
  8. When the chips are done, serve them with the yogurt and a spoon

Depending which yogurt you use and the quality of your tortillas, each serving is about 150 calories, 12 grams of protein, and 12 grams of carbohydrates.

Read Full Post »

I found a recipe in my Health Magazine for Quinoa and chickpea burgers. Normally that would be a huge stretch for me, but they sounded amazing so I thought I’d give them a try.

 

Verdict

SOOOOOOO good! I didn’t think I’d love this recipe, but I chowed it down. And I felt full for hours afterwards.

 

Variances to recipe that I made:

– Did not add the chile

– Used 2 whole wheat pocket thins instead of a pita for the “bun”

– Factored Greek Yogurt (in substitute of sour cream) into the calorie count

– Added lettuce to the pocket thins as well, so it was the burger, Greek yogurt and lettuce in mine.

– I don’t have a food processor and my blender failed to blend it (too dense) so I used a hand mixer.

 

Nutrition info. the way I made it via Spark People’s Recipe Calculator:

Nutrition Facts

User Entered Recipe
  4 Servings

Amount Per Serving
  Calories 436.7
  Total Fat 6.7 g
  Saturated Fat 0.6 g
  Polyunsaturated Fat 2.2 g
  Monounsaturated Fat 0.9 g
  Cholesterol 40.9 mg
  Sodium 993.2 mg
  Potassium 292.5 mg
  Total Carbohydrate 78.9 g
  Dietary Fiber 15.8 g
  Sugars 6.7 g
  Protein 22.8 g
  Vitamin A 4.7 %
  Vitamin B-12 5.5 %
  Vitamin B-6 24.3 %
  Vitamin C 6.0 %
  Vitamin D 2.2 %
  Vitamin E 1.4 %
  Calcium 22.1 %
  Copper 10.3 %
  Folate 18.7 %
  Iron 25.2 %
  Magnesium 20.2 %
  Manganese 43.7 %
  Niacin 15.8 %
  Pantothenic Acid     5.3 %
  Phosphorus     18.6 %
  Riboflavin 19.2 %
  Selenium 12.7 %
  Thiamin 6.2 %
  Zinc 9.1 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »