Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Grocery’

We just came back from a trip to the U.S. Virgin Islands (I know, poor us).  While we made both our breakfasts and lunches on the trips, we splurged on dinners and I splurged on calorie-dense tropical drinks (I choose the lowest-sugar ones I could).

We got home late, thanks to both of our planes being delayed, but thankfully I’d taken the next day off, which allowed me to do the most important part of coming back from a vacation and getting back on track with healthy eating: Go to the grocery store ASAP.

When we got home, the fridge was practically empty, and the next morning was a scrounge to find food, but right after breakfast, I headed-out to all of the stores.

Why is this so important?

It’s too easy, after a trip like this, to continue to eat out because it’s what you’ve been doing the last week or so and there’s no food in the house. This, I believe, adds to the weight gain of vacations. The quickest way to break this is to get healthy food stocked back up in your house ASAP. It took me 3 hours, but the photo shows our fridge now, well-stocked with healthy food options. And, we’re back on track.

So the next time you plan your vacation, also plan a half day to hit the stores and stock back up. Your weight and your blood sugar will thank you.

 

Our fridge stocked with lots of fruit and vegetables, lean dairy, and good protein options, including eggs, deli turkey, and tofu. In the giant green bowl is my chopped veggies for snacking.

Our fridge stocked with lots of fruit and vegetables, lean dairy, and good protein options, including eggs, deli turkey, and tofu. In the giant green bowl is my chopped veggies for snacking.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

I ended-up running a quick trip to the grocery store a couple of days ago on my lunch break.  I got to the check-out line and piled my items on the conveyor:

  • Plain Greek yogurt
  • Cauliflower
  • Sugar snap peas
  • Dried cranberries
  • Organic salad mix
  • Almonds
  • (I meant to pick-up tofu, but they were out)

The woman (most likely in her late 40’s, trim build) in front of me looked at my assortment of food and said “It looks like my diet. I keep telling my friend, if they want to be skinny, that’s what you have to eat.”

It reminded me of when I got behind some folks from Myanmar in a grocery line a few years ago. I watched them only pile fresh meat and produce on the conveyor. Part of me was annoyed because it took a long time for the cashier to key-in all the produce codes, but if I’m honest with myself, I was more annoyed because I knew what they were eating was better than what I was.

I’m glad I’m not the only one who scopes-out what others put on the line.

Read Full Post »

Recently, I was in Greece to check-out the sites and get in some much-needed relaxation.

Greek Yogurt is served over there, in some form, in breakfast (mostly in general yogurt format), lunch (Tzatziki sauce) and dinner (as a desert, with honey and chopped dried dates).  I have to say, the Greek Yogurt in Greece was WAY BETTER than what we have in the U.S. It was so rich and creamy.

Battle 1: Which Greek Yogurt, easily available in the U.S., is the closest to that in Greece?

This was a simple, easy battle. I walked into a typical Greek grocery store and looked at their yogurt section looking for any brands available in the U.S. Fage was the only one. In taste-testing the 0% and 2% versions of Fage, the 2% is the closest (still a touch too sour) to what we had in Greece. I’ve noticed that eating one of these for an afternoon snack keeps me full for hours, which is a miracle for me.

Battle 2: Lowest Added-Sugar Greek Yogurt

Milk naturally has sugar in it, about 7-8 grams naturally occur in an individual-size (7 oz.) Greek yogurt but that’s an ok amount, especially given the protein you are also getting at the same time. What’s not good, especially for hypoglycemics, but really everyone, is the ADDED sugar they put in them.

A sugar cube is 2.3 grams of sugar, so basically, for every 2 grams of additional sugar, you need to mentally picture another sugar cube.  Check out the sugar cube stacks for Yoplait yogurt as an example.

Obviously, plain Greek yogurt is going to have the least amount of added sugar (basically none), but most people want some flavor. What I’ve found is that the amount of sugar, even in just vanilla Greek yogurt, varies greatly depending on the brands. I had some fun at the grocery store and took photos of different brands and types, including one worst-case scenario. See the comments on each.

Baseline: Fage 2% no flavor is 7 oz. has 8 grams of lactose sugars and 20 grams of protein for 150 calories. This is without any added sugars (chocolate, honey, sugary granola, fruit, etc.). I recommend adding cinnamon vs. a sugar.


Yoplait Greek 100 Calorie Yogurt 4 pack vanilla 

Nutrition label for Yoplait 100 Greek Yogurt

Yes, it’s less calories and looks like a decent amount of sugar, but look at it closer; they messed with the serving size, it’s 5.23 ounces, so about 2 ounces less of yogurt. That explains why the sugars seem fine and the protein is low. I’m guessing this has about 1 sugar cube worth of sugar in it.

H-E-B Greek 100 Calories Vanilla Bean

My local store brand, also the cheapest.

H-E-B Greek 100 Calories Vanilla Bean

ALSO only 5.23 ounces, so much smaller. This has a lot less protein, but look at the sugar! There are at least 2 sugar cubs in this. Also, there are a lot of black dots in this yogurt, I’m thinking a lot of those aren’t vanilla bean seeds, vanilla bean seeds are pretty expensive.

Dannon Light & Fit Greek Vanilla

Dannon Light & Fit Greek Yogurt Vanilla

Also 5.3 ounces, this one tasted the most sugary to me, and I see why. It’s only 80 calories, but only 13 grams of protein and 9 grams of sugar, so I’d guess 2.5-3 sugar cubs in each of these. And you won’t be full.

Chobani Flip Almond Coco Loco Greek Yogurt

Worst case scenario right here, Chobani Flip Almond Coco Loco Greek Yogurt. It’s the same amount of ounces as the others, but remember about 1/3 of that is the toppings, so you’re actually getting a lot less yogurt. The protein is at 12 grams, but the sugar! Oh my! It’s 21 grams, which will definitely counteract the protein. I’m estimating that there are 7 sugar cubes in this.

Read Full Post »