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Posts Tagged ‘Hypoglycemic Diet’

Me: Look, I love you, but I made exactly the amount of cheese and crackers I want to eat right now. Wife: But I only ... Me: EXACTLY the amount

I can relate to this tweet so much, except it’s not my fiance usually saying it, it’s me. Before I put food on my plate, I portion-out exactly what my diet allows; meaning what will keep me healthy and keep my blood sugar even.

Also, my brother used to take food off my plate, so I have a strong reflective action to anyone who takes food off my plate.

So take at your own risk, or better yet, ask before you take. I’m a sharing person, I really am, but you may just hear from me that what’s on my plate is EXACTLY the amount of food I wanted.

 

 

 

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Two salads and two sides of tofu, ready to be reheated/have some oil added for easy food preparation. The masking tape has the reheating and final prep instructions right on them.

Here’s my low-carb, good fat, protein snack collection for easy snacking while I recover from surgery. This is a collection of Kind STRONG bars, ThinkThin bars, Zing bars, and dried-salted chick peas.

6 servings (1 cup each) of Kraft 30-minute chili mac, in individual containers for easy re-heating (note: I don’t reheat in plastic, so those are thawed and heated in bowls).

I recently had PRK eye surgery, which meant that I was going to not feel great and not really be able to see (due to light sensitivity) for a few days.  This posed a challenge for me as a hypoglycemic, since I still needed to maintain my diet. And, since I wouldn’t be able to work-out for a whole week, I needed to really make sure I ate healthy to maintain my weight.

My boyfriend (now fiance!, who was amazing during this, thank you so much!) was in charge of taking care of me during my healing process, including my meals. I wanted to make it as easy as possible on him because I definitely know how frustrating it can be do figure out all of the correct portions, measurements, etc.

So, the night before the surgery, I prepared some of easy-to-finish/easy to reheat meals that he could give me when I was hungry. This included (see photos above):

The salads and chili mac had final preparation instructions on masking-tape for him.

This worked really well, so I will definitely do it again if I’m having surgery again.

 

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Serves 2

Ingredients:

  • 2-3 corn tortillas per person
  • 1 can Bush’s Cocina Latina Refried Black Beans (any variety)
  • 1 can Enchilada sauce, medium heat
  • 1 small ripe avocado
  • 2-3 eggs per person
  • Shredded Mexican-style cheese

Directions:

  • Heat oven to 400 degrees, put tortillas on a cookie sheet and bake until they are completely crispy all the way through the tortilla (you could break them into corn chips)
  • While the tortillas are baking
    • Put refried black beans in a sauce pan and heat over low heat until warm
    • Portion-out enchilada sauce into 4 containers, freeze 3 for later use, heat one in either the microwave or in a sauce pan on low heat
    • Cut-up the avocado into small chunks
  • Fry the eggs to sunny-side up
  • Right before serving (otherwise the tortillas won’t be crunchy)
    • Place the tortillas on the place
    • Sprinkle cheese on the tortillas
    • Put about ½ of a spoonful of enchilada sauce on next
    • Put abut a spoonful of black beans on next
    • Put a couple of chunks of avocado on top
    • Place the hot egg on top of all of it
  • Serve immediately with the leftover black beans

In terms of how to eat them, some people are very polite and break off little pieces at once. We’re fans of picking up the whole thing and biting into it. Yep, the egg runs, but you can scoop up that yellowy goodness (or let it drip on your side of black beans) with a spoon later.

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Note the black, matte packaging and “manly” flavors, clearly marketing to men. Three different flavors of the King STRONG bars: Hickory Smoked, Honey Mustard, and Thai Sweet Chili

Three different flavors of the King STRONG bars: Hickory Smoked, Honey Mustard, and Thai Sweet Chili

I’m not sure if you actually get more volume out of the Kind STRONG Honey Mustard bar or if the ingredients are more “smushed” so it looks more filled.

 

Note: I was not compensated for this post nor did KIND know about this post prior to me publishing it. 

One of the questions I took to my dietician was snack ideas that would be good for my hypoglycemia, good for me overall, and were reasonable in cost.  She highly recommends KIND bars. Originally, I was eating the KIND + protein bars, but these didn’t seem to fill me up. She figured-out that my snacks need to be at 230 calories, so she recommended the higher-calorie KIND & Strong bars.

As a marketer, these bars make me laugh. They are clearly marketed to men, with the “savory” flavors and the black matte packaging, so I’ve nicknamed them “Bro Bars.” And, I was really skeptical of the non-sweet flavors because, like everyone else, I’ve been conditioned by the “bar” market to expect energy/protein bars to be sweet.

But they keep me full, keep my blood sugar even, and are actually quite good (once you get over your sweet expectation). These have become a staple in our house and a regular healthy snack when I’m traveling.

I’m also a fan of the price, which is about $1.20 each compared to other protein bars at $2.50 each.

Final note: These are really hard to find at local grocery stores. I contacted KIND and they recommended a few stores, one of which was Target, so that’s where I grab mine.

 

 

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Ok, I understand that most of us who drink a beer don’t really have “nutrition” on our mind at that point, but knowing that some beer distributors are voluntarily adding nutrition information is still exciting news.

Not only will this help hypoglycemics and other sugar-sensitive groups choose wiser at the pub or grocery store, but the list of ingredients will make it much easier for those with allergies or food sensitivities to know which brews are ok and which aren’t.

 

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Four eggs cooked in a tomato sauce in a frying pan

Admittedly, mine don’t look as pretty, but they are DELICIOUS

Tomato sauce divided between storage containers

The recipe I use says it’s enough to cook 6 eggs, but this is a lot of sauce! I find I have enough sauce for 10 eggs. I doubled the recipe, so here are 20 eggs worth.

 

I’m always on the hunt for recipes that are a) healthy b) easy to prepare and c) make me look like I’m a cooking rockstar.  This Shakshuka (Eggs in Hell) recipe fits the bill! Not only that, but it freezes really well, making it easy for me to make quick dinners on nights when I’m pressed for time.

My notes on preparation:

  • I cut the sugar in this recipe in half to make it more hypoglycemic friendly and because I prefer less of a sweet taste. This might also be because I’m using cane sugar.
  • I factor 2 eggs per person.
  • Whole grain sourdough bread is low on the glycemic index, so I serve the Eggs in Hell with this. I personally use one slice and load the eggs and tons of the sauce and eat it open-face.
  • The Shakshuka recipe has a serving size of 6 eggs, but I found this is a huge waste of the sauce. I find I can get 10 eggs worth of sauce out of one recipe.
  • I doubled the recipe in the photo above to have plenty to freeze.
  • I free about 1 cup per 2 eggs, you can see in the second photo above how I portion and label them (which helps me remember what size and what pan to use).

 

 

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One of my idiosyncrasies when it comes to food is that I never learned to like cooked fish, only raw fish. I know, I’m strange. Anyway, this means I’m a big fan of sushi. But sushi usually has a ton of white rice in it, which is not low-carb diet and/or hypoglycemic-friendly.

So I did some research (which was a great excuse for a trip to my favorite sushi spot in Houston, Soma Sushi) and you can eat sushi on a low-carb diet or a hypoglycemia diet, but you have to be careful.

Here’s the tips for enjoying sushi on a low-carb and/or hypoglycemic diet:

  • The white rice is the main culprit of blood sugar issues, although be wary of sauces and other sources of carbs.
  • Opt for non-rice rolls or low-rice rolls, such as the Summer Spring Roll and the Mermaid Roll in the photo above (note, one is fried, so it’s not completely innocent, but still low rice and DELICIOUS)
  • Opt for sashimi (no rice)
  • Research and ask about the amount of rice and carbs in each roll and choose wisely. For example, according to Diabetes Daily, a Shrimp Tempura Roll has 75 grams of carbs where a Philadelphia Roll only has 30 grams of carbohydrates.
  • If you aren’t sure about a particular roll’s amount of rice, take a look at online review sites for photos of the rolls.
  • If you’re like me, and your limit is 30-45 grams of carbs per meal, opt for one roll in that range and then fill-in the rest of the meal with no-carb options (such as sashimi, low-carb spring rolls, edamame, etc.)
  • Skip the alcohol as that adds carbs
  • Skip the group sharing experience. I always opt-out of this partially because I’m so picky (I don’t eat shellfish either) and because it’s too easy to lose-track of what you eat.
  • Ask for brown rice: This one I’m not 100% convinced of. While it helps, it doesn’t really fully solve the carbohydrate issue. And, I’m worried that some traditional sushi places will be offended if you ask for this. After not being able to find a good answer online, I contacted several sushi places to ask this question and only one responded (Soma Sushi again!) and said that it’s not offensive to ask, but they don’t  have brown rice.

 

Helpful links:

  • Diabetes Daily.  This article has wonderful suggestions as well as nutrition information (including carbohydrate counts) for many common rolls.
  • The Diabetes Experience. This article has great suggestions, especially related to portion control if you are eating with a group.
  • Just Hungry. This is a guide to chopstick etiquette. It’s really easy to offend accidentally using your chopsticks, so please read this.
  • Sushi FAQ. How to eat sushi etiquette. Very helpful tips on how to eat sushi in general and the etiquette of eating sushi.

 

 

 

 

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