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Posts Tagged ‘hypoglycemic’

The White House has announced a change to nutrition labels that is a very welcome change for everyone, but especially hypoglycemics and diabetics. Within the next two years, the labels will have a separate line showing the amount of sugar added (vs naturally occurring, such as milk sugar in yogurt).

While sugar is sugar, added sugar can really impact blood sugar levels and we should strive to eat as little added sugar as possible.

Cheers to the Gov!

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One of my idiosyncrasies when it comes to food is that I never learned to like cooked fish, only raw fish. I know, I’m strange. Anyway, this means I’m a big fan of sushi. But sushi usually has a ton of white rice in it, which is not low-carb diet and/or hypoglycemic-friendly.

So I did some research (which was a great excuse for a trip to my favorite sushi spot in Houston, Soma Sushi) and you can eat sushi on a low-carb diet or a hypoglycemia diet, but you have to be careful.

Here’s the tips for enjoying sushi on a low-carb and/or hypoglycemic diet:

  • The white rice is the main culprit of blood sugar issues, although be wary of sauces and other sources of carbs.
  • Opt for non-rice rolls or low-rice rolls, such as the Summer Spring Roll and the Mermaid Roll in the photo above (note, one is fried, so it’s not completely innocent, but still low rice and DELICIOUS)
  • Opt for sashimi (no rice)
  • Research and ask about the amount of rice and carbs in each roll and choose wisely. For example, according to Diabetes Daily, a Shrimp Tempura Roll has 75 grams of carbs where a Philadelphia Roll only has 30 grams of carbohydrates.
  • If you aren’t sure about a particular roll’s amount of rice, take a look at online review sites for photos of the rolls.
  • If you’re like me, and your limit is 30-45 grams of carbs per meal, opt for one roll in that range and then fill-in the rest of the meal with no-carb options (such as sashimi, low-carb spring rolls, edamame, etc.)
  • Skip the alcohol as that adds carbs
  • Skip the group sharing experience. I always opt-out of this partially because I’m so picky (I don’t eat shellfish either) and because it’s too easy to lose-track of what you eat.
  • Ask for brown rice: This one I’m not 100% convinced of. While it helps, it doesn’t really fully solve the carbohydrate issue. And, I’m worried that some traditional sushi places will be offended if you ask for this. After not being able to find a good answer online, I contacted several sushi places to ask this question and only one responded (Soma Sushi again!) and said that it’s not offensive to ask, but they don’t  have brown rice.

 

Helpful links:

  • Diabetes Daily.  This article has wonderful suggestions as well as nutrition information (including carbohydrate counts) for many common rolls.
  • The Diabetes Experience. This article has great suggestions, especially related to portion control if you are eating with a group.
  • Just Hungry. This is a guide to chopstick etiquette. It’s really easy to offend accidentally using your chopsticks, so please read this.
  • Sushi FAQ. How to eat sushi etiquette. Very helpful tips on how to eat sushi in general and the etiquette of eating sushi.

 

 

 

 

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A couple of weeks ago, I went to brunch with a friend. We met around 10 am and I had a couple of breakfast tacos and some amazing french press coffee. I didn’t overeat, but was full.

I was meeting my boyfriend at his house for dinner and he eats early (5:30 ish).  I wasn’t feeling hungry that afternoon, so all I at was a 100 calorie Greek yogurt.

At around 4:30 pm it hit me, a full-blown low blood sugar hypoglycemic attack. I didn’t know what was going at first until I realized I was getting very irritated with him on the phone for no reason, was light-headed and talking very fast.

So I ate something. But, since we were eating soon, I didn’t want to eat much. The problem was, I’d hit that point where I needed to eat and I had that “bottomless pit” hunger that I sometimes get when I get low. So I kept going back for more food, then more, instead of just eating something substantial the first time.

It took me a while to come out of it and I couldn’t drive to my boyfriend’s house for quite some time (since it’s basically the equivalent of driving drunk).

Mistakes (and lessons to learn):

  • Not eating a decent lunch, especially after having such massive doses of caffeine
  • When I did eat, not eating something substantial
  • Worrying more about staying skinny/being able to eat with my boyfriend vs. taking care of my health (which actually resulted in me downing probably 700 calories)

Consequences:

  • It was pretty scary. I felt horrible and felt a complete loss of control. I never want to feel like that again.
  • I felt terrible, like I’d been very sick
  • Didn’t get to spend as much time with my boyfriend
  • Gained 3 lbs from serious overeating

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Every once in a while, I have what I affectionately call a “bottomless pit” day. This is a day where I can put ANY teenage boy to shame with the amount of food I can consume. Seriously, I can eat double what I usually do and I simply can’t get myself full. It’s the most frustrating thing ever.

I’m sure it has SOMETHING to do with being hypoglycemic, but I have no idea what. Even calls to “nurse lines” leaves me, and the nurse on the other end, clueless. Are you eating healthy stuff? Yep. Are you eating carbohydrates? Yep. Are you eating fats and proteins? Yep, same diet as I do every other day and it works just fine then. Do you feel any different or like your blood sugar is low? Nope, I just can’t get full.

I understand there are factors, such as lack of sleep and stress, that can leave one feeling like they aren’t as full as they are, but I haven’t found any correlation to this either.

Oh, and the next day, I won’t have gained weight which I guess is the one bonus.

Anyone else have these? Anyone have any thoughts?

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