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Posts Tagged ‘Lifehacker’

Check out this Lifehacker article, What I learned from weighing myself 15 times in a day. Not only is it fascinating, but it’s funny too (come on, you know you laughed at the poop thing).

And it’s a good reminder not to stress about a few pounds, particularly if you are female, as you can fluctuate a lot during any given day.

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Ok, I understand that most of us who drink a beer don’t really have “nutrition” on our mind at that point, but knowing that some beer distributors are voluntarily adding nutrition information is still exciting news.

Not only will this help hypoglycemics and other sugar-sensitive groups choose wiser at the pub or grocery store, but the list of ingredients will make it much easier for those with allergies or food sensitivities to know which brews are ok and which aren’t.

 

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Today, on Lifehacker, there’s a great article, If you want to lose weight, you have to like your new lifestyle. An excerpt of the article:

Looking to their success stories, published both online and as highlighted by Anne Fletcher in her book exploring the registrants, Thin for Life, the one common theme is that while maintaining their losses requires ongoing effort, that effort isn’t perceived by these weight loss masters as a hardship but rather as just living with new lifestyles, and lifestyles that they enjoy.

This is something I’ve witnessed regularly in my own practice. Looking to my experiences working with thousands of patients over the course of the past dozen years, it’s clear that liking the life you’re living while you’re losing weight is the key to keeping it off.

I agree with this completely. When I was losing weight, I had to find cardio that I liked doing, and I had to (admittedly slowly) change what I liked to eat. The eating part also changed naturally as my body got used to less sugar and, thus, didn’t like high-sugar foods anymore.

I’d like to take it a step further though and relate it to hypoglycemia, also usually a huge diet change. You have to learn to enjoy your new diet. It’s a process, but the more of your new diet you eat, the more you will crave it. I now look forward to vegetables, my daily salad, etc. I promise you, if you stick with it, you’ll feel so good, you will love it too.

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Happy Unbirthday! Here’s a useful tool for you:

This Infographic Shows What 25 Grams of Protein Looks Like

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As someone with a background in marketing and a background in academic research, I highly recommend this article from Lifehacker Vitals about food marketing and research.

​How Food Marketers Make You Think You’re Choosing Healthy Food

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A table full of storage containers with portioned food in them.

Click on the photo to see the source.

 

Lifehacker Vitals posted a blog post about Exercise vs. Diet: Which is more important to weight loss. It was a really informative article, but also introduced me to the idea of “kitchen training.” I spend 6 hours a week in the gym training, but I’ve never thought of the time I spend preparing healthy meals in my kitchen as “training.”

So I started devoting a chunk of time each week to it and I’m surprised at not only how much it helps, but also how much I’m able to prepare in an hour or so a week! There are a lot of things, like baking chicken and cutting it up, where about 20 minutes worth of the activity is passive, meaning you can use that time to do other things. That’s where you see the real time savings.

That got me thinking, how much time does it really take to do some basic things in the kitchen that would mean healthier eating and money savings?  Check out some of my findings below and do some timing of your own!

 

Making espresso and milk at home

Active time: 1 minute to load the coffee in my brewer

Passive time (brewing on the stove): 6 minutes

Total time per week: About 14 minutes since my espresso makes multiple shots per brew

Coffee and milk supplies from the store for a month: $12

Starbucks latte 5 x per week for a month: $80

 

Making salads at home for lunch

Active time: Preparing chicken for baking: 10 minutes once per week to prepare the chicken and cut it afterwards, portions into the freezer, wash the pans used, etc.

Passive time (baking): 20 minutes once per week. I use this time to chop the cabbage and other ingredients I add to the salad.

Daily active time to put the salads together: 2 minutes

Salad and (including chicken) supplies for a month: $40

Daily salad from Salata with extra chicken, 5 x per week for a month: $220, not to mention the time saved going to Salata to get the salads.

 

Unloading the dishwasher

2 minutes and yet I never do this! I can totally spare 2 minutes once per week.

 

Washing dishes

I had tons of dishes including pots and pans to wash the other day. It took 12 minutes. Typically it takes me 5 minutes or less.

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Lifehacker has started a new Vitals health and fitness section. This is one of their first articles. It’s full of useful information including how to calculate your average calorie expenditure each day and how much protein you need.

Check it out!

Exercise vs. Diet: Which Is More Important for Weight Loss?

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