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Posts Tagged ‘nutrition’

Ok, I understand that most of us who drink a beer don’t really have “nutrition” on our mind at that point, but knowing that some beer distributors are voluntarily adding nutrition information is still exciting news.

Not only will this help hypoglycemics and other sugar-sensitive groups choose wiser at the pub or grocery store, but the list of ingredients will make it much easier for those with allergies or food sensitivities to know which brews are ok and which aren’t.

 

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The White House has announced a change to nutrition labels that is a very welcome change for everyone, but especially hypoglycemics and diabetics. Within the next two years, the labels will have a separate line showing the amount of sugar added (vs naturally occurring, such as milk sugar in yogurt).

While sugar is sugar, added sugar can really impact blood sugar levels and we should strive to eat as little added sugar as possible.

Cheers to the Gov!

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I ended-up running a quick trip to the grocery store a couple of days ago on my lunch break.  I got to the check-out line and piled my items on the conveyor:

  • Plain Greek yogurt
  • Cauliflower
  • Sugar snap peas
  • Dried cranberries
  • Organic salad mix
  • Almonds
  • (I meant to pick-up tofu, but they were out)

The woman (most likely in her late 40’s, trim build) in front of me looked at my assortment of food and said “It looks like my diet. I keep telling my friend, if they want to be skinny, that’s what you have to eat.”

It reminded me of when I got behind some folks from Myanmar in a grocery line a few years ago. I watched them only pile fresh meat and produce on the conveyor. Part of me was annoyed because it took a long time for the cashier to key-in all the produce codes, but if I’m honest with myself, I was more annoyed because I knew what they were eating was better than what I was.

I’m glad I’m not the only one who scopes-out what others put on the line.

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This is MADDENING. Our national nutritionists are trying to account for environmental and other non-sustainable agricultural practices when making recommendations on which foods we should be eating. But they are being told they can’t consider environmental factors BY CONGRESS.

THIS is what happens when lobbyists get involved.

Page 29, 2nd paragraph of the Congressional directive:
“The advisory committee is showing an interest in incorporating agriculture production practices and environmental factors into their criteria for establishing the next dietary recommendations. The agreement expects the Secretary to ensure that the advisory committee focuses on nutrient and dietary recommendations based upon sound nutrition science. The agreement directs the Secretary to only include nutrition and dietary information, not extraneous factors, in the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.”

Write your Congress representatives TODAY.

See the full story by NPR here

Congress to Nutritionists: Don’t talk about the environment

 

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This No Sugar Oat Drop Cookie recipe quickly became my go-to breakfast after a friend introduced it to me a few years ago. I go to the gym and then to work, so, because I’m hypoglycemic and because muscle repair is so important, I eat one of these and drink a glass of milk (much-needed protein) after my morning workout each day.

With all that said, I always wondered how the nutrition on them stacked up.

Below is the nutrition for them care of SparkPeople Recipe Calculator. As a side note, I happened to look at the coconut flakes I’m using and they are SWEETENED! Ugh! I’ll be looking for unsweetened next time.

 

Nutrition Facts 

User Entered Recipe 

  12 Servings

Amount Per Serving
  Calories 223.9
  Total Fat 10.3 g
  Saturated Fat 3.5 g
  Polyunsaturated Fat 2.0 g
  Monounsaturated Fat 3.9 g
  Cholesterol 0.0 mg
  Sodium 135.6 mg
  Potassium 250.7 mg
  Total Carbohydrate 29.6 g
  Dietary Fiber 3.4 g
  Sugars 15.9 g
  Protein 2.7 g
  Vitamin A 0.5 %
  Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
  Vitamin B-6 10.5 %
  Vitamin C 5.4 %
  Vitamin D 0.0 %
  Vitamin E 9.4 %
  Calcium 1.9 %
  Copper 5.5 %
  Folate 1.7 %
  Iron 5.8 %
  Magnesium 5.5 %
  Manganese 10.0 %
  Niacin 2.0 %
  Pantothenic Acid     0.9 %
  Phosphorus     3.4 %
  Riboflavin 4.0 %
  Selenium 0.7 %
  Thiamin 2.5 %
  Zinc 1.3 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

 

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