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Posts Tagged ‘stress’

Christmas, for me, isn’t an excuse to skip out on my health. And since I took yesterday off (usually Sunday is my rest day), I had to squeeze in a workout today.  Most gyms are closed, I didn’t get home til after dark (so no outdoor workout for me), and I needed cardio, so I had to resort to the one full-length cardio video I had, TurboJam.

Trust me, this isn’t an ad for these videos. I find the instructor annoying and her martial arts skills scary bad, but hey, it makes me sweat and works my abs, and I only have to use the video 1-2 times per year, so TurboJam it is.

Yes, I know, diet is more important, but that can be hard when eating away from home so much, so my workouts help keep me semi on track, my blood sugar in  decent check (staying away from the sweets), and my stress level low.

 

 

Photo of Turbo Jam exercise video playing on my TV

Ohhhhh I’m not looking forward to this…

Photo of a BeachBody workout video warning that reads, "You should always warm up for a few minutes before beginning any workout, and you should never exercise beyond the level at which you feel comfortable.

I know what they mean, people can take it too far, but part of the point of exercising is to push your limits, slightly.

 

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Stress impacts your body. At least, that’s what all of the research tells us. It also impacts your blood sugar, which makes it a very important topic for those of us with hypoglycemia. And, oftentimes, especially as hypoglycemics, we’re so involved in making the correct diet and fitness decisions, that our mental health, our personal well-being goes by the wayside. In this series, we’ll discuss a variety of ways to manage your stress and, in the process, manage your blood sugar.

So I have this friend. Let’s call her Lisa. And her and her husband are about to do something incredibly daring and amazing; they are moving to a foreign country at the end of this year.

That’s amazing enough, but here’s where the incredible part comes in, neither of them are fluent in the language and neither of them have secured jobs yet. But they are going nonetheless.

Right now, they are under quite a bit of stress, and understandably so. Everything about this decision seems very illogical. But you know what? I admire them for doing it anyway and I’m glad they are.

When I think back to the stories that older people have told me about their lives, those that they are the most proud of and those that are the most interesting to tell, it’s never “I worked hard, bought a house, raised a family.” Those are admirable deeds, but it’s the stories about throwing caution to the wind, taking a chance on life, taking a leap of faith, that make life so memorable and make for great stories. The tales of “We went backpacking across Europe for a year” or “I decided to spend two years in Asia volunteering for an aid organization” are the ones I, and I’m guessing we all, want to hear.

And here’s the thing about those stories, some don’t well, but you don’t hear any regrets. Sometimes people come back from backpacking across Europe and are so broke they had to move back in with parents. Sometimes they try something and it fails that they have to come home. But they recover, and they will still tell you it’s worth it. And, when the story is told later, you rarely hear someone focus on the end and what went wrong. They instead focus on the adventure along the way.

So Lisa, I’m 100% in your corner and cheering you on. If it helps to read this post when things become uncertain, it’d be an honor if you did so. Cheers to your new adventure!

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Stress impacts your body. At least, that’s what all of the research tells us. It also impacts your blood sugar, which makes it a very important topic for those of us with hypoglycemia. And, oftentimes, especially as hypoglycemics, we’re so involved in making the correct diet and fitness decisions, that our mental health, our personal well-being goes by the wayside. In this series, we’ll discuss a variety of ways to manage your stress and, in the process, manage your blood sugar.

Most of the time, I’m one of the most intense and cerebral people you’ll meet, oftentimes to a fault. So, I can see how it would seem odd, to my friends, family and coworkers, that, in the most intense situations, I’ll wander up them and make a big deal over savoring a cookie (a tiny, tiny piece for me), or a piece of chocolate, or a pretty flower or sunset.

Why do I do that in those moments? Because it creates a break in the tension, a moment of peace, and a reminder of something good.

I’m reminded of the scene in The Hobbit right after Thorin Oakenshield is killed; Bilbo is trying to process through his emotions when Gandalf sits next to him, and picks at his pipe. It’s somewhat comical to watch, but effective. Gandalf is by no means a simple person, but he uses the pipe to remind him, and others, to not always be so intense, to enjoy the small, good things in life.

In Zen Buddhism, there’s the story (the flower sermon) of the Buddha holding up a flower and only one of his disciples smiles.  The most common interpretation of this is that knowledge can be transferred without words or letters, but when I read this story, I can also see how this exemplifies the idea that, something so simple can bring a moment of clarity and peace.

In Christianity, I’ve heard several sermons talk about stressful situations draining your “bucket” and how you need to make sure you keep your bucket full (with love, things that bring you peace and joy, etc.), or at least not let it empty. With this interpretation, a moment of simple joy could be a way to refill the bucket, even if it is partially.

Whatever philosophy above works for you, I encourage you to give it a try. You may just find that that moment of simplicity may be what you need to get through a rough situation.

 

 

 

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Every once in a while, I have what I affectionately call a “bottomless pit” day. This is a day where I can put ANY teenage boy to shame with the amount of food I can consume. Seriously, I can eat double what I usually do and I simply can’t get myself full. It’s the most frustrating thing ever.

I’m sure it has SOMETHING to do with being hypoglycemic, but I have no idea what. Even calls to “nurse lines” leaves me, and the nurse on the other end, clueless. Are you eating healthy stuff? Yep. Are you eating carbohydrates? Yep. Are you eating fats and proteins? Yep, same diet as I do every other day and it works just fine then. Do you feel any different or like your blood sugar is low? Nope, I just can’t get full.

I understand there are factors, such as lack of sleep and stress, that can leave one feeling like they aren’t as full as they are, but I haven’t found any correlation to this either.

Oh, and the next day, I won’t have gained weight which I guess is the one bonus.

Anyone else have these? Anyone have any thoughts?

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