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Posts Tagged ‘Traveling Healthy’

I was traveling for work and rushing to visit a dojo for a 2 hour karate workout, but I needed to eat. So, I stopped at a Corner Bakery to get a light meal in.

Scanning their menu, my best light option was their Harvest Salad. The only problem? This salad is actually 780 calories. Way too much. I needed something between 400 and 500 calories.

In addition, there were some things on the salad that have a high Glycemic Index and my dietician has warned me against eating (mainly dried fruit and white bread).

So here’s how I fixed it:

  • I ordered the dressing on the side and used  very little of it.
  • I picked-out all of the cranberries (I forgot to ask them to leave those out)
  • The white bread went into the trash.
  • I left the protein (chicken) and the healthy fats (walnuts) to make sure I was still full after.

(and yes, I cleaned up after myself)

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Bye bye calories and high glycemic index parts of my salad.

 

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Note the black, matte packaging and “manly” flavors, clearly marketing to men. Three different flavors of the King STRONG bars: Hickory Smoked, Honey Mustard, and Thai Sweet Chili

Three different flavors of the King STRONG bars: Hickory Smoked, Honey Mustard, and Thai Sweet Chili

I’m not sure if you actually get more volume out of the Kind STRONG Honey Mustard bar or if the ingredients are more “smushed” so it looks more filled.

 

Note: I was not compensated for this post nor did KIND know about this post prior to me publishing it. 

One of the questions I took to my dietician was snack ideas that would be good for my hypoglycemia, good for me overall, and were reasonable in cost.  She highly recommends KIND bars. Originally, I was eating the KIND + protein bars, but these didn’t seem to fill me up. She figured-out that my snacks need to be at 230 calories, so she recommended the higher-calorie KIND & Strong bars.

As a marketer, these bars make me laugh. They are clearly marketed to men, with the “savory” flavors and the black matte packaging, so I’ve nicknamed them “Bro Bars.” And, I was really skeptical of the non-sweet flavors because, like everyone else, I’ve been conditioned by the “bar” market to expect energy/protein bars to be sweet.

But they keep me full, keep my blood sugar even, and are actually quite good (once you get over your sweet expectation). These have become a staple in our house and a regular healthy snack when I’m traveling.

I’m also a fan of the price, which is about $1.20 each compared to other protein bars at $2.50 each.

Final note: These are really hard to find at local grocery stores. I contacted KIND and they recommended a few stores, one of which was Target, so that’s where I grab mine.

 

 

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“Fresh Homemade Panini” by snowpea&bokchoi, via Flickr Creative Commons is licensed under CC BY 4.0

1/2 of the original panini. See how much bread that is before they press it? May too many carbs

Fixed as much as I could. I put all of the meat/cheese on one side and hollowed-out the bread. There was no mustard to be found (even though the sandwich was supposed to have it, boo)

I was in the Reno airport pretty early in the day, so options for an early lunch were still pretty limited. The healthiest option I could find was a ham and cheese panini, but because I wasn’t going to eat it for 2 hours (the longest you can have meat/cheese out of the fridge and have it be safe).

When I got the cold/unpressed panini, I was shocked to see how thick the bread was! I thought paninis were made out of thin bread, but nope, they are made of thick bread that’s been pressed thin (see the top image to see what one looks like after being pressed).

Knowing that that much bread (especially white bread) would cause me hypoglycemia blood sugar issues, I hollowed-out one side of the bread as thin as I could, put all of the meat and cheese on one side, and ate that. When I got to San Francisco airport a few hours later, I ate a super-healthy salad.

So lesson-learned: If you want a hot sandwich or panini, ask to see the bread ahead of time and make sure it’s thin and a low-glycemic index bread

Addition fun fact: According to my native-speaking Italian friends, “panini” actually translates to “bread” not “sandwich,” so if you ask for a “panini” in Italy, unless they’ve been Americanized, they might just hand you bread.

 

 

 

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A set of Seat to Summit plastic silverware including a fork, knife, and spoon

My Sea to Summit silverware set, drying on a towel in a hotel room for it’s next use

Note: I was not compensated for this post nor did Sea to Summit know about this post prior to me publishing it. 

I travel often and, even when I’m home, I’m on-the-go quite a bit. This has presented a challenge as, although there are fully portable snack options out there, many still require silverware, such as Greek yogurt and graham crackers with peanut butter. And, as you know, I love to take salads with me (Traveling? Take a Whole Foods salad with you) on trips.

This has not only left me scrambling for plastic silverware (or forgetting to, which is worse) whenever I buy a snack or a salad, but also left me with eco-guilt for creating the additional waste from plastic silverware (which isn’t recyclable).

And then I remembered that I saw Sea to Summit portable silverware at my local camping store. One lunch trip and $11 later, I had a set that I clipped inside my backpack, which always goes with me on trips.

Admittedly, the silverware is a bit big for me. It seems like it was designed for maximum inhalation quickly while backpacking and for mostly men to use, so if you get these, be extra-careful to measure out your portions ahead of time and don’t fill the spoon for each bite.

But the benefits far outweigh the size issue. Not only does this solve the silverware worry and some of my eco-guilt, but it also is incredibly sturdy. I’ve used them multiple times, sometimes roughly, and kept them clipped in a backpack that is constantly thrown around. After two months, they still look brand-new. And, as I’ve already eluded to, the carabiner clip they come with is really convenient and makes it harder to lose them.

If you eat a lot of meals on the go, I highly recommend this set of portable silverware.

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I went to my dietician to find out what snacks I could eat, as a hypoglycemic, that are good for me, will keep my blood sugar even, and keep me full.

She really emphasized balancing carbs, protein, and fat in my snacks, so you’ll see that below. I had asked specifically for very portable snacks since I travel a lot.

Note: She had originally gave me 200 calorie snacks, but I was still hungry two hours later, so these are all around 230 to 240 calories. You may need to adjust up or down depending on your activity level (I burn 1,400 calories just resting each day).

 

 

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I live in Texas, which is technically the South, but last week I was in an area of the country that was, what most people would consider, the “deep south.” I was there for a work conference, staying at a major university hotel with a conference center attached to it.

Food

The hotel is about 10 minutes walking distance from other food options. Luckily, they do have a cafeteria, but healthy options are not this cafeteria’s strong point. Breakfast was biscuits and gravy, eggs,  grits, potatoes, and bacon. The lunch special was fried chicken.

How I got around it:

  • I asked for eggs and two pieces of whole wheat toast for breakfast each morning. They didn’t have peanut butter, but luckily I’d brought my own. So I put that on the toast with a little bit of grape jelly (I know, I know, that is bad, it was less than one of the individual servings each day) and had that.
  • The first day lunch I was able to get a turkey sandwich wrap made with turkey, cheese, lettuce and mustard. I ended-up tearing off about 1/3 of the tortilla.
  • I went to a local organic grocery store and stocked-up on vegetables, Greek yogurt, and fruit. I’d brought peanut butter, nuts and various protein bars with me, so I had those for snacks. The hotel room had a fridge. If not, I request a medical exemption (I don’t tell them that I’m hypoglycemic, I just request one) and ask for a fridge.
  • For dinners, I chose the healthiest thing I could on the menu where we went. The night I was on my own, I went to vegetarian restaurant and had tofu, falafel, and veggies.

 

Fitness

The fitness center was pretty much non-existent. It was a hotel room converted into a fitness center. It had 2 old treadmills, 2 old elliptical machines, one old reclining bike, an ab bench, and a mat for floor work. No weights, and exceptionally low ceilings (a normal jump up meant I hit the top of the ceiling). I could buy a pass to the university gym for $7 per day, but I’m too cheap for that and didn’t feel like working out with that many students.

Here’s how I made it work:

  • I did a Pilates video one day
  • The next day, I did HITT training exercises for 20 minutes, then had some time later in the day for an hour long walk around the campus (which, thankfully, was very hilly and beautiful weather)
  • The following day, I did an online no weights exercise video (not linking to it because I didn’t like it that much).
  • The following day, back to the HITT training and hour long walk

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Two cooler bags full of chopped carrots, celery, cucumbers and water,

Recently, I was in a city about 4 hours away from me for 4 days for a conference. The hotel had a refrigerator in it (thank you Hyatt!) so I packed-up a bunch of veggies, hummus, and other healthy snacks and hit the road! it definitely made eating healthier much easier and kept my hypoglycemia in check.

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